Antique Georgian Engraving of English Philanthropist Jonas Hanway Marine Society

Antique Georgian Engraving of English Philanthropist Jonas Hanway Marine Society
Antique Georgian Engraving of English Philanthropist Jonas Hanway Marine Society
Antique Georgian Engraving of English Philanthropist Jonas Hanway Marine Society
Antique Georgian Engraving of English Philanthropist Jonas Hanway Marine Society
Antique Georgian Engraving of English Philanthropist Jonas Hanway Marine Society

Antique Georgian Engraving of English Philanthropist Jonas Hanway Marine Society

Bibelotslondon Ltd is a UK registered company based in London Bridge dealing in ephemera and curiosities from Britain and around the world. Our diverse inventory is carefully chosen and constantly evolving. We work very hard to offer the highest quality works at competitive prices. Our inventory is listed online, and we strive to keep our website completely up to date, so our customers can easily check availability.

We believe in offering clients items that are unique and rare for aficionados of the antique and collector's world. Bibelot is a late nineteenth century word derived from the French word bel beautiful, meaning a small item of beauty, curiosity or interest. The word ephemera is derived from the sixteenth century Greek word ephmera meaning a printed or hand written paper not meant to be retained for a long period of time. Painted and Engraved at the Desire of the Governors of the Marine Society. 1780', and the motto'Never Despair'.

Hanway is seen writing a letter at his desk with a book placed to his right entitled'Infant Poor & Police'. Through his window can be seen the Monument to the Great Fire of London. Housed in its original antique black wooden and gold frame. He was an English traveller and philanthropist, born in Portsmouth. Whilst still a child, his father, who had been a victualler, died, and the family subsequently moved to London.

In 1729, Jonas was apprenticed to a merchant in Lisbon. In 1743, after he had been in business for himself for some time in London, he became a partner with Mr Dingley, a merchant in St Petersburg, and in this way was led to travel in Russia and Persia. Leaving St Petersburg on 10 September 1743, and passing south by Moscow, Tsaritsyn and Astrakhan, he embarked on the Caspian Sea on 22 November and arrived at Astrabad on 18 December. Here his goods were seized by Mohammed Hassan Beg, and it was only after great privations that he reached the camp of Nadir Shah, under whose protection he recovered most (85%) of his property. His return journey was embarrassed by sickness (at Resht), attacks from pirates, and six weeks' quarantine; he only arrived at St Petersburg on 1 January 1745. He again left the Russian capital on 9 July 1750 and travelled through Germany and the Netherlands to England (28 October). The rest of his life was mostly spent in London, where the narrative of his travels (published in 1753) soon made him a man of note, and where he devoted himself to philanthropy and good citizenship.

The Marine Society which he established in 1756 was the worlds first charity dedicated to seafarers. Its history dates back to 1756 when Britain was on the brink of war with Europe. He was concerned his crew would be poached to fight in the Kings navy. His solution was as pragmatic as it was philanthropic.

He recruited boys from poor backgrounds and gave them naval training so they were equipped to fight on the Kings ships. While this protected his own business interests, it also gave the boys a chance for a respected career, when few other opportunities were open to them. Over 100 years later it developed into the Royal Navy. By the time of the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805 a significant proportion of manpower for the navy was being supplied, trained and equipped with Marine Society boys. The charity continued to support young people, clothing and training them on training ships up until 1944, when war signalled a shift in direction and a decision was taken to instead assist other maritime organisations and help individuals who wished to go to sea professionally, but were unable to find the means financially of doing so. In 1976 the Marine Society consolidated its position of supporting the maritime community even further when it merged with the Seafarers Education Service. The charity continued to provide and develop educational services to seafarers along with the provision of libraries to ships.

Today the charity contiunes to champion the well-being, personal, and professional development of seafarers and now delivers a range of services appreciated by seafarers across the globe. The charity focuses on education/professional development, financial support, book/media services, and advice & guidance He died, unmarried, on 5 September 1786 and was buried in the crypt at St. A monument to his memory, sculpted by John Francis Moore was erected in Westminster Abbey in 1786. Hanway was the first Londoner, it is said, to carry an umbrella, and he lived to triumph over all the hackney coachmen who tried to hoot and hustle him down.

He attacked vail-giving, or tipping, with some temporary success; by his onslaught upon tea-drinking he became involved in controversy with Johnson and Goldsmith. His last efforts were on behalf of little chimney-sweeps. His advocacy of solitary confinement for prisoners and opposition to Jewish naturalization were more questionable instances of his activity in social matters. He helped alter the trade imbalance between Britain and France in engravings and initiated a British tradition in the art form.

A former engraver himself, Boydell promoted the interests of artists as well as patrons and as a result his business prospered. The son of a land surveyor, Boydell apprenticed himself to William Henry Toms, an artist he admired, and learned engraving.

He established his own business in 1746 and published his first book of engravings around the same time. He became a successful importer of French prints during the 1750s but was frustrated by their refusal to trade prints in kind. To spark reciprocal trade, he commissioned William Wollett's spectacular engraving of Richard Wilson's The Destruction of the Children of Niobe, which revolutionised the print trade.

Ten years later, largely as a result of Boydell's initiative, the trade imbalance had shifted, and he was named a fellow of the Royal Society for his efforts. In the 1790s, Boydell began a large Shakespeare venture that included the establishment of a Shakespeare Gallery, the publication of an illustrated edition of Shakespeare's plays, and the release of a folio of prints depicting scenes from Shakespeare's works. Some of the most illustrious painters of the day contributed, such as Benjamin West and Henry Fuseli. Throughout his life, Boydell dedicated time to civic projects: he donated art to government institutions and ran for public office. In 1790 he became Lord Mayor of London. The French Revolutionary Wars led to a cessation in Continental trade at the end of the 1790s and without this business, Boydell's firm declined and he was nearly bankrupt at his death in 1804. Size of Print: 65.5 x 41 cm approx Size of Frame: 71 x 57.5 cm approx. Photos form part of the description.

The item "Antique Georgian Engraving of English Philanthropist Jonas Hanway Marine Society" is in sale since Monday, March 12, 2018. This item is in the category "Art\Art Prints". The seller is "bibelotslondon" and is located in London. This item can be shipped worldwide.


Antique Georgian Engraving of English Philanthropist Jonas Hanway Marine Society